To Wish Upon a Star, acrylic, collage, and spray paint on paper, 30″ x 22″, 2020

My work is autobiographical and serves as my safe space to talk about the experiences I went through being a sexual abuse survivor at a young age of 8 and onwards. The art I create is this place for me to explore the feelings I was and am going through.

Bonding the Soul, acrylic, collage, and spray paint on paper, 30″ x 22″, 2020

It was a highly painful experience for me mentally especially feeling ashamed for not speaking out about it until I was in my early 20s. Having negative perceptions of sex with the idea of being queer man and the perpetrator being male added more complexity while growing up. Whenever I talk about my experiences, I felt like I am objectifying it to where I am distant and not properly acknowledging the nuanced.

Taking a Shower, acrylic, collage, and spray paint on paper, 30″ x 22″, 2020

This distancing of my emotions comes down to my personality. I am able delve into my past and present in my work and simply illustrate my experiences. I believe being open about my experiences help me bring closure to myself since I lived more than 10 years of my life in secrecy about what happened to me. I am happy to share pages of my diary to the audience and to find beauty in simply being alive.

Dream Eater Acrylic, collage, and spray paint on paper , 42″ x 36″, 2020

“I work intuitively and most often paint with a palette knife. Although the works involve traditional paint mediums, I consider them drawings as well. Preferred mediums are acrylics and spray paints and I relish in its large coverage and fast drying times. I use the palette knife to create marks on the surface until an image emerge. The spray paint assists in highlighting and diminishing certain portions of the piece. The process is always the focal point and transport me to a child-like state. The lack of preconceived ideas helps alleviate the thoughts of artmaking being homework. In a way, the art making process is like my reclamation of youth that was tarnished and lost.”

To Sing, Laugh, and Play , acrylic and spray paint on 160 gsm Strathmore paper, 90″ x 92″, 2020

Artist Biography

Narong Tintamusik (He/Him) is an artist based in Dallas, TX. He explores themes of identity, sexuality, memory, and innocence. His works are often drawn from experiences with the natural world. He obtained his Biology undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at Dallas with a minor in visual arts.

He has exhibited in group shows locally in Dallas and beyond including New York, Canada, and Germany. He is currently a part of Artist Co-op 500X Gallery and had his first solo there in early 2020. He has been the recipient the DeGoyler Memorial Fund from the Dallas Museum of Art in 2015.

In addition to being an artist, Tintamusik is an art collector and curator where his focus often lies on the ideas of identity, figuration, the gaze, fashion, love, and nature. He is an advocate for emerging artists in terms of collecting their works early in their careers. His first curatorial exhibit, Queer Me Now: The Queer Body and Gaze, showcased five young LGBTQIA artists based in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area that explored the act of viewing one’s body and other’s through queer lens. The exhibit was shown at 500X Gallery and The MAC in Dallas, TX. He also started Musik, a virtual curatorial platform that offer solo exhibitions to artists without gallery representation through invitational and open calls.

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